How Much is a Used Tesla Model X

How Much is a Used Tesla Model X

The Telsa Model X holds the distinction of having the highest base price of any vehicle in the Silicon Valley automaker’s lineup, and it’s not hard to see why. Even compared to premium rides like the Chevy Tahoe, the Tesla Model X is a beast, checking virtually every box on the full-size SUV wishlist. 

Let’s talk about performance: the base Long Range model can hit 60MPH in 3.8 seconds, with its internal dual-motor platform delivering 670 peak horsepower. The sportier Plaid version, packing a 1,020 HP tri-motor powertrain, reaches it in just 2.5 seconds. Put simply: it’s fast. 

And then we get to the actual experience of owning one. There’s a joke about how Tesla cars are effectively just smartphones on wheels, with technology taking precedence over everything else. With the Model X, it’s true. 

That’s not a bad thing. Features like Autopilot and Summon (which is exactly what it sounds like) are undeniably convenient, and will leave you the envy of your friends. Welcome reassurance comes from the Model X’s extensive suite of safety technology, which prevents collisions by constantly monitoring data from an array of cameras, ultrasonic sensors, and RADAR antennas. 

And then you get to the interior. The word “luxury” doesn’t come close to describing the Tesla Model X’s finishings. 

There are no drab plastic dashboards here. No mechanical instruments. Everything comes neatly clad in wood and leather. A huge 17-inch high definition display gives access to everything you need, from maps and music, to information about the battery’s charge level and overall health. 

The steering position is similarly distinct. Instead of a rounded wheel, the Model X uses a U shaped yoke, similar to that you’d see in the cockpit of an aircraft. Meanwhile, the instrument panel is replaced with a dynamic screen, showing real-time information about the vehicle’s speed and range. 

It’s a great car. But great doesn’t come cheap, and the base Long Range Model X’s $89,990 starting price ($119,990 if you opt for the higher-performance Plaid version) is a major barrier to entry. Fortunately, there are bargains to be found if you look towards the pre-owned market.

How much is a used Tesla Model X?

Tesla started deliveries of the Model X in 2016. Since then, it’s undergone seven revisions and upgrades. Although Tesla cars are more resilient against the forces of deprecation than other luxury automobiles, they’re not immune, and pricing varies based on age, configuration, and mileage. 

It’s also worth noting that the Tesla Model X design has scarcely changed in the years between 2016 and 2020, which accounts for virtually all used models in circulation. The main points of differentiation are range, the sophistication of its onboard computer equipment, and battery size.

2016 Tesla Model X (from $59,650)

2016 Tesla Model X (from $59,650)

Tesla released five models during 2016: the 60D, 70D, 75D, 90D, and P100D. These refer to the capacity of the batteries, with the 60D packing a 60KWh battery, the 70D capable of pushing 70KWh, and so on. Battery size corresponds faithfully with range, but it also has a bearing on performance. 

Larger batteries mean you can run faster without necessarily compromising on range. This explains the discrepancy in acceleration between models of the same year, with the 60D hitting 60MPH in six seconds, while the P100D can do the same in just 2.9 thanks to its “Ludicrous Mode.” 

Confusingly, the 60D was identical to the 75D in terms of hardware, with owners able to unlock the car’s extra power by paying extra. It is also, incidentally, the shortest lived, with just five months on the market. 

Used 2016 Telsa Model X cars cost anywhere between $50,000 and $60,000. The base 60D model is the most affordable, with an entry price of $50,400. A 90D with moderate mileage can go for $54,500.

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2016 Tesla Model X (from $59,650)

Tesla released five models during 2016: the 60D, 70D, 75D, 90D, and P100D. These refer to the capacity of the batteries, with the 60D packing a 60KWh battery, the 70D capable of pushing 70KWh, and so on. Battery size corresponds faithfully with range, but it also has a bearing on performance. 

Larger batteries mean you can run faster without necessarily compromising on range. This explains the discrepancy in acceleration between models of the same year, with the 60D hitting 60MPH in six seconds, while the P100D can do the same in just 2.9 thanks to its “Ludicrous Mode.” 

Confusingly, the 60D was identical to the 75D in terms of hardware, with owners able to unlock the car’s extra power by paying extra. It is also, incidentally, the shortest lived, with just five months on the market. 

Used 2016 Telsa Model X cars cost anywhere between $50,000 and $60,000. The base 60D model is the most affordable, with an entry price of $50,400. A 90D with moderate mileage can go for $54,500.

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2017 Tesla Model X (from $56,550)

2017 Tesla Model X (from $56,550)

Not much changed in 2017. Only two differences are worth noting. First, the line-up. In August, the company discontinued the 90D version. Additionally, it upgraded the car’s self-driving computer to version HW2.5. 

This isn’t as big a leap as you’d expect. HW2.5 didn’t add any additional computational power, focusing on reliability instead. It did come with a software update that enabled Tesla’s Dashcam and Sentry Mode, which allow the owner to record the car’s surroundings while driving and parked respectively. 

This is reflected in the pricing. There’s really not much difference in cost between a 2016 vintage Model X and one from 2017. The base 75D can be found for as little as $56,550, which is largely reflective of the lower mileage with these more recent models.

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2017 Tesla Model X (from $56,550)

Not much changed in 2017. Only two differences are worth noting. First, the line-up. In August, the company discontinued the 90D version. Additionally, it upgraded the car’s self-driving computer to version HW2.5. 

This isn’t as big a leap as you’d expect. HW2.5 didn’t add any additional computational power, focusing on reliability instead. It did come with a software update that enabled Tesla’s Dashcam and Sentry Mode, which allow the owner to record the car’s surroundings while driving and parked respectively. 

This is reflected in the pricing. There’s really not much difference in cost between a 2016 vintage Model X and one from 2017. The base 75D can be found for as little as $56,550, which is largely reflective of the lower mileage with these more recent models.

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2018 Tesla Model X (from $60,950)

2018 Tesla Model X (from $60,950)

This year also saw few changes to the Model X, save for an upgrade to the MCU (Main Computer Unit), which powers the infotainment system. Although this sounds modest, it’s actually more significant than you might think. 

Previous versions of the Model X were widely criticized by owners and reviewers alike for its sluggish infotainment system, and its relative lack of responsiveness. This update saw Tesla replace the MCU’s outdated Nvidia processor with one made by Intel, thus giving a smoother experience when navigating or using the onboard web browser.

We see a major jump in price when it comes to the 2018 version, with low-mileage P100D models going for $78,500, while the base 75D sells for $65,000.

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2018 Tesla Model X (from $60,950)

This year also saw few changes to the Model X, save for an upgrade to the MCU (Main Computer Unit), which powers the infotainment system. Although this sounds modest, it’s actually more significant than you might think. 

Previous versions of the Model X were widely criticized by owners and reviewers alike for its sluggish infotainment system, and its relative lack of responsiveness. This update saw Tesla replace the MCU’s outdated Nvidia processor with one made by Intel, thus giving a smoother experience when navigating or using the onboard web browser.

We see a major jump in price when it comes to the 2018 version, with low-mileage P100D models going for $78,500, while the base 75D sells for $65,000.

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2019 Tesla Model X (from $77,150)

2019 Tesla Model X (from $77,150)

As we enter 2019, things get a bit more interesting. First: Tesla ditched the base 75D mode at the start of the year, which at this point was showing its age. In its place, it added a long-range version, touting an EPA-rated range of 325 miles and smart air suspension. The P100D was meanwhile redubbed “Performance.” 

These models continue to command a premium. The base model can be found for $72,000, whereas a Performance variant with a mere 8,000 miles on the clock costs as much as $92,600.

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2019 Tesla Model X (from $77,150)

As we enter 2019, things get a bit more interesting. First: Tesla ditched the base 75D mode at the start of the year, which at this point was showing its age. In its place, it added a long-range version, touting an EPA-rated range of 325 miles and smart air suspension. The P100D was meanwhile redubbed “Performance.” 

These models continue to command a premium. The base model can be found for $72,000, whereas a Performance variant with a mere 8,000 miles on the clock costs as much as $92,600.

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The Tesla Model X 2020 and beyond

The most recent Tesla Model X models are vanishingly rare on the used market, due to their inherent newness. Still, let’s touch on what makes them different, to give you an idea of what to expect in the months and years ahead. 

2020 saw little movement in the Model X, save for modest bumps to acceleration and battery life. The biggest change came in 2021, as Tesla simplified the Model X into two models: Long Range and Plaid, which replaced the previous Performance trim level. 

The Plaid saw Tesla repurpose the same powertrain used in the previous Model S, which allowed it to hit 60MPH in just 2.5 seconds, with a range of 340 miles between charges. Updates to the Long Range variant were comparatively minor, with the powertrain now able to hit 60MPH in just 3.8 seconds, with a range of 360 miles. 

Tesla also refreshed the infotainment system, self-driving systems, and interior design, and added four wireless charging pads for smartphones and other compatible devices, like headphones.

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Why buy used?

The Tesla Model X really hasn’t changed much since its first release. Although it has seen some incremental improvements over the years, the fundamental experience remains unchanged. As such, it’s hard to recommend a new version over used. By opting for a used 2016 model, buyers can save as much as $40,000. That’s nothing to sniff at. 

And if you buy with Shift, you also benefit from a seven-day returns period and a 150-point mechanical inspection from one of our trusted engineers, as well as a free 30-day warranty on our certified cars. To find your next Tesla Model X, head here.

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Author
Shift Editorial Team