What's The Real Price Of A Ford Mustang?

What's The Real Price Of A Ford Mustang?

The Ford Mustang isn't just a timeless American icon. It's also one of the best-selling cars around the world. More than 10 million have taken to the roads all over the planet since the vehicle's debut in 1965, when approximately 22,000 Mustangs were sold on the first day alone. And still today, more than 60 years later, it's easy to understand why.

A pioneer of the pony car class that was second in seniority only to the now-extinct Plymouth Barracuda, which was released just two weeks earlier than the Mustang, it stands as the longest-surviving member of the lot.

Needless to say, a lot has changed in the world since 1965. And as timeless as it may be in essence, a lot has changed on the Mustang, too. A quick look at the 2021 edition proves this much.

How much does a Ford Mustang cost?

The Ford Mustang comes in five different trims that feature two body styles – the fastback and the convertible – and several different engines, with prices for new models falling in the range of $27,000-$70,000. Topping the lot in terms of total cost is the iconic Shelby GT500, which is rigged with a 5.2-liter supercharged V-8 engine and a seven-speed dual clutch transmission. 

Buyers have the option to tack on an additional $10,000 for the carbon fiber handling or $18,500 for the carbon fiber track packages, as well as choice of a dozen different body colors. And then there are the classic, iconic Shelby racing stripes, which come in blue, black or white, for another $1,000-$10,000.

But depending on their age, mileage and specific add-ons, used Mustangs cost significantly less. On average, 2012-2016 base models hover between $13,000-$19,000, while GT models from similar years fall in the low-to-mid $20,000s. GT Premiums tend to go for slightly more than $30,000. And generally speaking, the price of late-year models, which are those manufactured within the last six years, is in the mid-to-upper $30,000s.

What is the Mustang 5.0's price?

Traditionally, the name “5.0” denotes a Mustang that's outfitted with a 5.0-liter V-8 engine, which allows for significantly more horsepower under the hood. 

The Mustang 5.0 engine first came into play shortly after the car's debut in 1965, and over the following decades it underwent its fair share of tweaks and growth spurts. Ford took a break from the 5.0 from 1996 to 2011, and then in 2012 the company released a reworked take on the four-cylinder V-8 engine and dubbed it the Coyote. First generation Coyote 5.0 engines packed 412-420 horses into 2012-2014 Mustang GT models, while second and third generations of the Coyote, which debuted in 2015 and 2018, upped the Mustang GT's total horsepower to 435 and 460, respectively.

These days, most new Mustangs – save for slower, more fuel-efficient EcoBoost models – sport 5.0-liter V-8 engines, including the GT and Mach 1 varieties. The 2021 Shelby GT500's engine sizes are slightly larger, at 5.2 liters. New Mustang GTs start at $36,000, while the Mach 1 kicks off at $52,720. Those prices pale in comparison to the 2021 Shelby GT500, whose MSRP sticker price is just shy of $73,000. 

Used Mustangs rigged with 5.0 V-8s, however, tend to hover in the low-$20,000s for 2011-2015 GT models and in the low-$30,000s for 2016 and newer GT models. 

Then there's the limited-edition Mustang Bullitt, inspired by the 1968 Steve McQueen movie of the same name. Bullitts are priced approximately $10,000 more than same model-year GTs and come in a “Dark Highland” green option, a shade that was also inspired by the film. But under the hood they're essentially identical as a less-costly GT.

How much is a Mustang GT?

New Mustang GTs – available in either fastback hardtop or convertible body styles – start at $36,120, $40,120 for the GT Premium edition and $45,620 for the GT Premium convertible. Standard on all three are the 5.0-liter V-8, 460 horsepower-strong engine, a six-speed manual transmission and Ford's Track Apps feature that clocks performance metrics in the instrument cluster. Upgrades on the Premium fastback and convertible include ebony aluminum wheels, special summer-only tires, Bremo brake clippers, Torsen differentials, a performance rear wing on the fastback and spoiler delete on the convertible.

Used Mustang GTs, depending on the model year, can save potential buyers on average $10,000-$15,000. Models made between 2010 and 2012 tend to go for $20,000 or so, while more recent editions – 2017 and newer – run around $30,000. Used Mustang GT Premiums are usually an additional $5,000 on top of the GT price.

2019 Ford Mustang GT Premium (from $41,500)

 2019 Ford Mustang GT Premium (from $41,500)
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30-days warranty
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Shop Used Ford Mustang GT
 2019 Ford Mustang GT Premium (from $41,500)
Free 7-day return
30-days warranty
No-Contact Test Drives
Shop Used Ford Mustang GT

What is Mustang EcoBoost?

EcoBoost is what Ford calls the 4-cylinder turbo 2.3-liter engine that's standard to the Mustang base model. While it gets an additional six miles to the gallon of combined fuel economy – 24 as opposed to 18 – the tradeoff is that it lags the horsepower of the GT and Mach variants, 310 compared to 460 specifically. Essentially, it's a more alluring way of saying it's a smaller, slower but – on the plus side – a more fuel-efficient engine. And it still soars to 60 mph in less than five seconds, just a tad slower than its peppier siblings that clock 60 in less than four seconds.

The EcoBoost comes in either the fastback or convertible body styles; the fastback allows for the option of a premium package with additional options that include 19-inch aluminum wheels and Ford's Sync 3 voice-automated command system.

New 2021 EcoBoosts fall on the lower end of the Mustang price spectrum, starting at $27,155 for the fastback base model, $32,175 for the EcoBoost Premium and $32,655 for the EcoBoost convertible. Going with a certified used Mustang EcoBoost over a new one usually equates to an average savings of $7,000-$10,000, if not more.

With so many trim levels – EcoBoosts, GTs, Machs and Shelbys – along with engine options and seemingly endless add-ons and color options on top of that, piecing together a new Mustang from scratch can be downright overwhelming. 

But browsing the many certified used options via Shift's easily navigable website takes all the hassle out of shopping for the perfect Mustang. There's no haggling or any pressure coming from pushy salespeople. That means you can shop, compare, finance and buy with ease from the comfort of your own home, all with the click of the button. They even deliver the car right to your front door.

And thanks to Shift's 150-point inspection and 30-day warranty, standard to their entire certified-used inventory, you can rest assured that when the car pulls into the driveway, it'll be good as new.

2018 Ford Mustang EcoBoost (from $27,950)

2018 Ford Mustang EcoBoost (from $27,950)
Free 7-day return
30-days warranty
No-Contact Test Drives
Shop Used Ford Mustang EcoBoost
2018 Ford Mustang EcoBoost (from $27,950)
Free 7-day return
30-days warranty
No-Contact Test Drives
Shop Used Ford Mustang EcoBoost

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Author
Shift Editorial Team